You Are Wanted, Yet, You Radiate


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I want Washi, charcoal, cassette player, sound recording 2018  This cassette tape player was covered with the tree rubbings around Gowanus NY, currently under the development site, and was used in the performance “ You are Unwanted, Yet, You Radiate.”  Includes the tape recorded with human voice “I want, I am necessary” by man, woman, and child voice overdubbing.

I want
Washi, charcoal, cassette player, sound recording
2018

This cassette tape player was covered with the tree rubbings around Gowanus NY, currently under the development site, and was used in the performance “ You are Unwanted, Yet, You Radiate.”

Includes the tape recorded with human voice “I want, I am necessary” by man, woman, and child voice overdubbing.

In 2018, Miyamori was an artist-in-residence for the Lower East Side Ecology Center. At the end of her residency, she created a site-specific performance at the E-Waste Warehouse with vocals from Ami Yamasaki, and two performers Juri Nishio and Aoi Sato.

Miyamori’s performance used the old technology at the center combined with the vocals and dance, to give voice to the abandoned and once praised, electronics at the warehouse. Technology plateaus, but for about 30 years, technology moved at a fast pace, constantly releasing newer and upgraded versions. Floppy disks quickly became CD’s that became USB flashdrives, basic calculators costing thousands of dollars and now built into cellphones, and older technology quickly lost value. Miyamori saw the interaction between technology and humans and wanted to create a performance to emphasize that even if society deems you as outdated, that you still have a voice to radiate.

Artist Statement by Keiko Miyamori:

A beautiful skylight was shining and I was alone in the space. I was observing the neighborhood and thinking of what I could do during the Artist-in-Residency Program. Every day, a great number of discarded electronics come into the E-waste Warehouse in Gowanus, Brooklyn, which is now a major development site in the city.  Electronic components piled up and overflowed. Once they were wanted, at high prices, then thrown away. I learned that many of the trees in the neighborhood were cut down, thrown away on the land being developed. It may be easier not to think about how to live with old stuff.  For many, it is not a big deal because they can always buy or plant something new. I wonder if these habits are a reflection of how people feel about themselves – in a society where some individuals feel like they have been thrown away?

In the long term, everyone will essentially be thrown away or removed from the living anyway. In nature, it may be not a big deal because creatures or life forms that can’t adapt to new environments are selected out. So, even if we are all in an unwanted existence here, we can still radiate, as beautiful as possible, for a moment in time while on earth.  And respecting the old things, treating them well, living with them, may be of equal value to respecting human relationships – our friends, our families, ourselves.

I decided to create tree rubbings on washi paper from around Gowanus. The trees I rubbed, which may disappear in the next couple of years. l utilized a site currently being developed, a residential site, and a commercial site in the neighborhood. I will display the rubbings on the wall at the warehouse during E-Waste Warehouse Open Studio, Sept 1-14. The distinct skylight spots here and there, the objects are sometimes in light, sometimes in the shadow.

Read the full press release here.

Download the performance outline here.

PAINTINGS OBJECTS IN SURFACE RESIN ON SITE INSTALLATION DRAWINGS RUBBINGS PROJECTS & WORKSHOPS