Conclusion of BankART 1929 in Yokohama, Japan

Over the last few months, artist Keiko Miyamori stayed in Japan for her Spring residency at BankART 1929 in her hometown of Yokohama, Japan. During her stay, she focused on two projects-- Tsunagu Book and her Portrait series.

Booth 21, Keiko Miyamori, at BankART 1929 Station, Spring Residency 2019 in Yokohama, Japan.

Booth 21, Keiko Miyamori, at BankART 1929 Station, Spring Residency 2019 in Yokohama, Japan.

Yoshino-Cho 4-18 in Kanagawa, japan, the address of the hospital in which Keiko Miyamori was born. It has since been demolished and turned into a subway station. The linen with the charcoal rubbing became the foundation for  Portrait of Myself, no. 3 .

Yoshino-Cho 4-18 in Kanagawa, japan, the address of the hospital in which Keiko Miyamori was born. It has since been demolished and turned into a subway station. The linen with the charcoal rubbing became the foundation for Portrait of Myself, no. 3.

During the residency, her Portrait series expanded. Three new works were added to the series over the course of two months. Her first work made and kept in her New York studio, Portrait of Myself no. 1, is a large linen canvas that combined black charcoal drawings, with rubbings made of gampi and washi. The work served as a basis for her new series, with her personal style of drawings finally reemerging into her larger works, after being only seen in her sketches. At BankART she completed three new portraits.

Beginning of her three portraits. The linen from Yoshino-Cho 4-18 provided the base for  Portrait of Myself, no. 1 , whereas  Portrait of Myself, no. 2  (on ground) was a transposed tree rubbing on washi to linen, and  Portrait of a Novelist  (leaning against wall) was built into the frame.

Beginning of her three portraits. The linen from Yoshino-Cho 4-18 provided the base for Portrait of Myself, no. 1, whereas Portrait of Myself, no. 2 (on ground) was a transposed tree rubbing on washi to linen, and Portrait of a Novelist (leaning against wall) was built into the frame.



Two portraits were a continuation of her original, combining elements with white chalk drawings and washi rubbings made from around her childhood surroundings. Beginning with the linen foundation, which was used to transpose a tree rubbing from the site of the hospital where she was born, she visited the sites of the old playground she once frequented, the backyard of her childhood home, the path she took to elementary school, retracing her memories. The intimate nature of the series allows her to fully immerse herself into the work, creating connections between her own very specific memories and portrait, to the portrait of Takeo Arishima, who served as the subject of her third portrait at BankART, “Portrait of a Novelist. “

Keiko creating a rubbing, the only one that is not using a tree, at a playground in Minami-ku, Yokohama, where she used to play as a child.

Keiko creating a rubbing, the only one that is not using a tree, at a playground in Minami-ku, Yokohama, where she used to play as a child.

Keiko Miyamori’s workspace at Booth 21.

Keiko Miyamori’s workspace at Booth 21.

Portrait of Myself, no. 2  Charcoal, washi, chalk, linen 185 x 323 x 5 cm 2019

Portrait of Myself, no. 2
Charcoal, washi, chalk, linen
185 x 323 x 5 cm
2019

on wall :   Portraif of Myself, no. 3  Charcoal, washi, chalk, on linen 185 x 323 x 5 cm 2019   on ground:   Portraif of a Novelist  Charcoal, washi, chalk, wood frame 50 x 40 x 5 cm 2019

on wall:
Portraif of Myself, no. 3
Charcoal, washi, chalk, on linen
185 x 323 x 5 cm
2019

on ground:
Portraif of a Novelist
Charcoal, washi, chalk, wood frame
50 x 40 x 5 cm
2019

Detail of  Portrait of Myself, no. 3  (2019).

Detail of Portrait of Myself, no. 3 (2019).

While Portrait of a Novelist had been made to fit within a medium frame, using the structure to hang from to create flowing layers, Portrait of Myself No. 2 and Portrait of Myself no. 3 use a frame as a removable piece that is covered in washi. As the viewer walks passed the work, the gampi— an even thinner washi made by Umeda Washi in Fukui, Japan— moves from the combined force of the energy of the person itself and the breeze their walk causes, to unveil the frame. The many layers of her “Portrait” series move alongside the viewer, creating interactions and connections.

Exhibition view from open studio.

Exhibition view from open studio.

In September, Miyamori will be returning to Japan for her solo show in Karuizawa at the Kogen Bunko using one of the works developed at BankART, “Portrait of a Novelist.” She will continue working to expand the series as well, for her Fall show in New York.

For more information on her concept for the show, you can find the online version of her booklet here.