Solo show in Japan 日本での展覧会のご案内です

Keiko Miyamori is pleased to announce she will be in Nagano, Japan, during the months of September and October holding two solo exhibitions at The Literary Museum of Karuizawa where she will be presenting A Portrait of A Novelist, and at pace around. Following her exhibitions in Japan, she will return to New York for her solo exhibition featuring an installation as well as her Portrait series, at MH Projects in East Village, New York, on October 23rd.

 
 

The Literary Museum of Karuizawa

Keiko Miyamori, Portrait of A Novelist" (URL)
Through 10/13(Sun) 9AM〜5PM
202-3 Nagakura, Karuizawa, Kitasaku, Nagano
0267-45-1175

pace around

Keiko Miyamori x pace around
10/1 (Tue)〜 10/31 (Thurs) 9:00〜17:00 (Close Wed,10/15)
400-158 Shiono, Miyota, Kitasaku, Nagano(map
0267-32-7007 



軽井沢高原文庫、旧有島武郎別荘「浄月庵」

宮森敬子『ある小説家の肖像ー生きているものと死んでいるものの間に』展 (URL)
高原文庫本館では「加賀乙彦展」開催中
10月13日(日)まで 会期中無休 9:00〜5PM
長野県北佐久郡軽井沢町長倉202-3
お問合せ:0267-45-1175
在廊日:10/3 (木)、10/4(金)午前、10/5(土)午前、10/6日(日)午前、 10/13日(日)午前

pace around

10月1日(火)〜 10月31日(木) 10:00〜18:00 (水休、10/15休)
長野県北佐久郡御代田町塩野400-158 (地図
お問合せ:0267-32-7007
在廊日:10月1日(火)終日、5日(土)6日(日)午後



Release of Tsunagu Book Map || 横浜BankARTレジデンスのご報告 その2

Thank you for the support and participation in Tsunagu Book at BankART1929!

 
#190298, ジーヴスの事件簿, in Yokohama, Japan.

#190298, ジーヴスの事件簿, in Yokohama, Japan.

 

The interactive map has finally launched, and you can search the map to see other books and trees but also your own. Thank you for your patience and we hope you enjoy seeing the connections made from just BankART1929 Station in Yokohama. There were approximately 140 participants in the project, reaching beyond just Yokohama, spreading the connections around the entirety of Japan.

If you have any questions, please contact Keiko Miyamori at keiko.miyamori1@gmail.com
There are some books that have yet to be sent in, so please send an image of the book (with the code visible) to Keiko at the email above, if you have not done so yet.


Visit the map here.


#190369, cover with book. Photo taken by artist Tatsuji Ushijima.

#190369, cover being wrapped around book. Photo taken by artist Tatsuji Ushijima.

#190369 completed book. Photo taken by artist Tatsuji Ushijima.

バンクアートのオープンスタジオのご報告 その2

オープンスタジオに来てくださった皆さま、樹拓の本カバーを持ち帰ってくださった方々、本当にありがとうございました。データを整理し、140名ほどのご本をマップに記載できましたので、ご報告いたします。

#190278, 終らない旅, in Kawasaki, Japan.

#190278, 終らない旅, in Kawasaki, Japan.

#190278 tree, made in Yokohama, Japan.

#190278 tree, made in Yokohama, Japan.

お写真はいつでもアップできます。(個人名は見れません) まだ記載されていない場合にはKeiko.miyamori1@gmail.com

までご協力頂けると幸いです。

バンクアートでの2ヶ月半、色々なバッククラウンドの作家の方たちと過ごせて、とても充実した時間を過ごさせていただきました。地図の作成が遅れてしまってすみませんでした。

今後ともどうかよろしくお願いいたします。

宮森敬子

Visit the map here.

Tsunagu Books at BankART1929, Spring Residency 2019

Over the last few months, artist Keiko Miyamori stayed in Japan for her Spring residency at BankART 1929 in her hometown of Yokohama, Japan. During her stay, she focused on two projects—Tsunagu Book and her Portrait series.

Photo by Tomoko Hasuwa, an artist at BankART1929 Station. Created using a tree rubbing from around BankART1929 Station in Yokohama, covering her favourite book.

Photo by Tomoko Hasuwa, an artist at BankART1929 Station.
Created using a tree rubbing from around BankART1929 Station in Yokohama, covering her favourite book.

Her Tsunagu Book project is a sub-series of her original Tsunagu Books in 2009, focusing on her residency and the site grounds. During this series, she unites people through their favourite book. The participants favourite book is covered with washi with a tree rubbing from around BankART 1929 Station in Yokohama, Japan. Each book represents the participants favourite book, and the positive energy and emotion that is felt for their book, no matter the reason it is their "favourite."

Book code #190447,  俳句歳時記  . Taken at BankART1929 Station.

Book code #190447, 俳句歳時記 .
Taken at BankART1929 Station.

Miyamori collected rubbings from not only around Yokohama and BankART itself, but also around her travels throughout Japan in conjunction to her other project, her Portrait series. Rubbings were taken from around the sites she visited for  Portrait of Myself No. 2, Portrait of Myself No. 3, and Portrait of a Novelist. Her Tsunagu Book series supported her travels around Japan during her residency but focused on the visitors and artists themselves at BankART.

Photo taken by Junko Suzuki, an artist at BankART1929. Book code #190188,  Anno’s Animals  by Mitsumasa Anno.

Photo taken by Junko Suzuki, an artist at BankART1929.
Book code #190188, Anno’s Animals by Mitsumasa Anno.

We’d like to thank everyone who participated in Keiko Miyamori’s journey at BankART1929 Station this Spring, and supported her. For everyone who participated in Tsunagu Books, Japan, you can check your book and tree here.

 

For more information on her concept for the show, you can find the online version of her booklet here.

Book code # 190404,  日記 .

Book code # 190404, 日記.




Conclusion of BankART 1929 in Yokohama, Japan

Over the last few months, artist Keiko Miyamori stayed in Japan for her Spring residency at BankART 1929 in her hometown of Yokohama, Japan. During her stay, she focused on two projects-- Tsunagu Book and her Portrait series.

Booth 21, Keiko Miyamori, at BankART 1929 Station, Spring Residency 2019 in Yokohama, Japan.

Booth 21, Keiko Miyamori, at BankART 1929 Station, Spring Residency 2019 in Yokohama, Japan.

Yoshino-Cho 4-18 in Kanagawa, japan, the address of the hospital in which Keiko Miyamori was born. It has since been demolished and turned into a subway station. The linen with the charcoal rubbing became the foundation for  Portrait of Myself, no. 3 .

Yoshino-Cho 4-18 in Kanagawa, japan, the address of the hospital in which Keiko Miyamori was born. It has since been demolished and turned into a subway station. The linen with the charcoal rubbing became the foundation for Portrait of Myself, no. 3.

During the residency, her Portrait series expanded. Three new works were added to the series over the course of two months. Her first work made and kept in her New York studio, Portrait of Myself no. 1, is a large linen canvas that combined black charcoal drawings, with rubbings made of gampi and washi. The work served as a basis for her new series, with her personal style of drawings finally reemerging into her larger works, after being only seen in her sketches. At BankART she completed three new portraits.

Beginning of her three portraits. The linen from Yoshino-Cho 4-18 provided the base for  Portrait of Myself, no. 1 , whereas  Portrait of Myself, no. 2  (on ground) was a transposed tree rubbing on washi to linen, and  Portrait of a Novelist  (leaning against wall) was built into the frame.

Beginning of her three portraits. The linen from Yoshino-Cho 4-18 provided the base for Portrait of Myself, no. 1, whereas Portrait of Myself, no. 2 (on ground) was a transposed tree rubbing on washi to linen, and Portrait of a Novelist (leaning against wall) was built into the frame.



Two portraits were a continuation of her original, combining elements with white chalk drawings and washi rubbings made from around her childhood surroundings. Beginning with the linen foundation, which was used to transpose a tree rubbing from the site of the hospital where she was born, she visited the sites of the old playground she once frequented, the backyard of her childhood home, the path she took to elementary school, retracing her memories. The intimate nature of the series allows her to fully immerse herself into the work, creating connections between her own very specific memories and portrait, to the portrait of Takeo Arishima, who served as the subject of her third portrait at BankART, “Portrait of a Novelist. “

Keiko creating a rubbing, the only one that is not using a tree, at a playground in Minami-ku, Yokohama, where she used to play as a child.

Keiko creating a rubbing, the only one that is not using a tree, at a playground in Minami-ku, Yokohama, where she used to play as a child.

Keiko Miyamori’s workspace at Booth 21.

Keiko Miyamori’s workspace at Booth 21.

Portrait of Myself, no. 2  Charcoal, washi, chalk, linen 185 x 323 x 5 cm 2019

Portrait of Myself, no. 2
Charcoal, washi, chalk, linen
185 x 323 x 5 cm
2019

on wall :   Portraif of Myself, no. 3  Charcoal, washi, chalk, on linen 185 x 323 x 5 cm 2019   on ground:   Portraif of a Novelist  Charcoal, washi, chalk, wood frame 50 x 40 x 5 cm 2019

on wall:
Portraif of Myself, no. 3
Charcoal, washi, chalk, on linen
185 x 323 x 5 cm
2019

on ground:
Portraif of a Novelist
Charcoal, washi, chalk, wood frame
50 x 40 x 5 cm
2019

Detail of  Portrait of Myself, no. 3  (2019).

Detail of Portrait of Myself, no. 3 (2019).

While Portrait of a Novelist had been made to fit within a medium frame, using the structure to hang from to create flowing layers, Portrait of Myself No. 2 and Portrait of Myself no. 3 use a frame as a removable piece that is covered in washi. As the viewer walks passed the work, the gampi— an even thinner washi made by Umeda Washi in Fukui, Japan— moves from the combined force of the energy of the person itself and the breeze their walk causes, to unveil the frame. The many layers of her “Portrait” series move alongside the viewer, creating interactions and connections.

Exhibition view from open studio.

Exhibition view from open studio.

In September, Miyamori will be returning to Japan for her solo show in Karuizawa at the Kogen Bunko using one of the works developed at BankART, “Portrait of a Novelist.” She will continue working to expand the series as well, for her Fall show in New York.

For more information on her concept for the show, you can find the online version of her booklet here.

Open Studio at BankART1929 Station May 31st-June 19th, 11-7pm || オープンスタジオ成果物の展示として、オープンスタジオを開催します。5月31日(金)〜6月9日(日)11〜19時

As the residency comes to a close, BankART will have an open studio from May 31st until June 19th, between 11-7pm. There will be an open studio at both BankART Station as well as BankART Silk during those days. To visit Keiko’s work, she will be at Booth 21 at BankART Station.

At Miyamori’s booth, she will also be making tree-rubbing book covers for a special Tsunagu project based in her home town in conjunction with her current project. Each cover is unique, with a rubbing from around the site in Yokohama. Miyamori will continue working on her Portrait series at her booth, currently working on her portrait with its base layers from her childhood home and the surroundings that had nurtured her. The Portrait contains tree rubbings holding her memories throughout Yokohama, within drawings to outline her history. She will be using the same technique to make another piece during the open studio.

Please come to show support for the amazing artists at the residency, but also bring a book if you would like to participate in her special project based around her hometown.

オープンスタジオ
成果物の展示として、オープンスタジオを開催します。
5月31日(金)〜6月9日(日)
11〜19時

BankART SILK(日本大通駅下車)でも同時開催


ー ス で は 、訪 れ て 下 さっ た 方 に 、世 界 に 一つ し か な い ユ ニ ー ク な「 和 紙 の 本 カ バ ー 」を無料で差し上げています。(ぜひ、参加してください)生まれ故郷である記憶の中の横浜。産 声 を あ げ た 住 所 を 最 下 層 に 、幼 稚 園 、小学校などを歩いて、周辺の樹皮模様を手製の木炭で和紙に写し、ドローイング、コラージュを繰り返します。層状に表された幼少時 代 の 記 憶「My Portrait」、同様の技法で他の作品も公開制作しています。

新スペースについては、ここをクリックしてください。

BankART Event on April 12 at BankART Station with Naoki Seki and Tomoko Hasuwa

Keiko Miyamori, along with Naomi Seki and Tomoko Hasuwa, will present their residency plans, on April 12th, at BankART Station in Japan.

Time: 6.30-8.30pm
Location: BankART Station
220-0021 Yokohama City Nishi Ward Minato Mirai 5-1 Shintakashima Station B1F
045-663-2812
(Get off at the ticket gate / underground 2nd floor of subway, Minatomirai Line "Shintakashimacho" station, and enter on the right)

Miyamori will present her two series she will be working on, one that is new, and one that is a new sub-series specific to her residency. Please come support her as well as the other artists in the residency! There are 25 artists in the residency program this summer; every Friday and Saturday at 6.30-8.00pm there will be a presentation from a selection of the artist in the program. At the end of the residency, there will be an open studio held as an exhibition, from May 31 (Friday) to June 9 (Sunday) between 11am to 7pm.

To read the full press release in Japanese, please click here.

Japanese Residency at BankART, Yokohama, Japan || 横浜でBankART1929のレジデンスに参加します

 
Image via BankArt1929

Image via BankArt1929

 

Keiko Miyamori will be doing a three-month residency in Japan at BankART1929, a multi-use art space, in Yokohama, Japan, from April 4th, 2019 until June 9th, 2019. She will continue her Tsunagu Book project, as well as begin a new project while in Japan. It will be an open studio at the space at the end of the residency from May 31st, 2019 - June 9th, 2019.. If you would like to contact Keiko Miyamori for specific hours she will be at the studio, you can reach her at keiko.miyamori1@gmail.com.

For their full press release in Japanese, please click here.
To visit their website, only available in Japanese, please click here.


2019年2月8日にオープンした横浜のBankART1929の新スペースで、4月4日から2019年6月9日までの間、滞在制作します。 日本に4月はじめに到着し、繋ぐ本プロジェクトのほか、日本にいる間に新しいプロジェクトを始めます。会期の最後に、全ての作家のオープンスタジオがありますので、お近くにお越しの際は、ぜひお立ち寄りください。宮森のスタジオ滞在予定などについては、直接keiko.miyamori1 @ gmail.comまでご連絡ください。 

新スペースについては、ここをクリックしてください。
BankARTのウェブサイトは、ここをクリックしてください。

Performance at NY E-Waste Warehouse 9.5.18

Keiko Miyamori and Ami Yamasaki performing at the LES Ecology E-Waste Warehouse on September 5th, 2018.

From LES Ecology:

You Are Unwanted, Yet, You Radiate

Our Artist-in-Residence, Keiko Miyamori, has created site specific performance art at our E-waste Warehouse. As part of this installation, she will put on an hour of performance art, featuring recordings of “primal vocals” from vocalist Ami Yamasaki along with other performers from Japan on September 15, 4-5pm. This unique movement and sound performance aims to ‘shine light’ on the world of the discarded.

Stop by the warehouse to witness this unique performance that utilizes the warehouse space in a very special way. The audience should follow ‘the sound’ during the performance.

Art: Keiko Miyamori
Voice/Vocal: Ami Yamasaki
Movement: Aoi Sato
Light: Kazue Taguchi
MC: Troy Hanna

When: 4-5pm, Saturday, September 15, 2018
Where: E-Waste Warehouse, 469 President Street
Open to the Public – Suggested Donation $5

Ami Yamasaki is a vocalist and cross-media artist from Tokyo. Yamasaki creates installations, performance pieces and directs films. With primal vocals and movement, she explores the possibilities of a deeper understanding towards the mechanism of the world. Asian Cultural Council grantee (NY, 2017), Asian Fellow of Japan Foundation (Philippines, 2018). Her work is diverse and prolific; ranging from the collaborations with many artists and musicians such as Keiji Haino, Yasunao Tone, Akira Sakata, and Ryuichi Sakamoto.

Keiko Miyamori is a visual artist, born in Yokohama and grew up in Tokyo. Miyamori’s work encompasses natural materials such as charcoal, mineral pigments, and washi paper. She also creates project-based workshops and installations. Visiting Scholar, University of Pennsylvania Graduate School of Fine Arts (Philadelphia,1998-99); Transformation Grant, Leeway Foundation (Philadelphia, 2008); Fellowship in the Arts, The Independence Foundation (Philadelphia 2010); Grantee, Asahi Shimbun Foundation (Japan 2018); Among other Awards.

Artist Statement from Keiko Miyamori

A beautiful skylight was shining and I was alone in the space. I was observing the neighborhood and thinking of what I could do during the Artist-in-Residency Program. Every day, a great number of discarded electronics come into the E-waste Warehouse in Gowanus, Brooklyn, which is now a major development site in the city.  Electronic components piled up and overflowed. Once they were wanted, at high prices, then thrown away. I learned that many of the trees in the neighborhood were cut down, thrown away on the land being developed. It may be easier not to think about how to live with old stuff.  For many, it is not a big deal because they can always buy or plant something new. I wonder if these habits are a reflection of how people feel about themselves – in a society where some individuals feel like they have been thrown away?

In the long term, everyone will essentially be thrown away or removed from the living anyway. In nature, it may be not a big deal because creatures or life forms that can’t adapt to new environments are selected out. So, even if we are all in an unwanted existence here, we can still radiate, as beautiful as possible, for a moment in time while on earth.  And respecting the old things, treating them well, living with them, may be of equal value to respecting human relationships – our friends, our families, ourselves.

I decided to create tree rubbings on Washi paper from around Gowanus. The trees I rubbed, which may disappear in the next couple of years. l utilized a site currenly being developed, a residential site, and a commercial site in the neighborhood. I will display the rubbings on the wall at the warehouse during E-Waste Warehouse Open Studio, Sept 1-14. The distinct skylight spots here and there, the objects are sometimes in light, sometimes in the shadow.

Click HERE to be taken to the LES Ecology post.

Click HERE if you missed the show and would like to read about the performance.